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TCAA Mom’s Scholarship

The TCAA is pleased to announce the creation of a new MOM’S Scholarship in the amount of $1000.00 to be used to help defer expenses associated with the recipient’s tuition and travel when studying with a TCAA member. The MOM’s Scholarship is to be awarded to a woman seeking to improve her skills in one of the 4 TCAA Disciplines of Rawhide Braiding, Silver Smithing, Bit and Spur Making, and Saddle Making. The individual applying must have as a primary goal working full time in one of the 4 listed disciplines if not already so engaged. Prospective applicants may apply with a short bio and a minimum of 4 pictures of their BEST work. Each applicant must show a dedication to improving their skills in the chosen discipline and their goals must be aligned with those of the TCAA as evidenced in the TCAA Mission Statement.

TCAA Saddelmaker John Willemsma created the Mom’s scholarship to honor his mother Mrs. Tena Willemsma. A women who is and will be remembered for her ability to inspire others while living an exemplary life with strength and grace.

Tena Willemsma immigrated to the United States in 1956 from Holland. She raised 6 children and worked hard to receive her GED at age 52. Two years later she concluded her education and received her certification as an LPN. For the next 20 years Tena worked nights as a registered nurse, finally retiring at the age of 74.

Tena Willemsma a strong and determined woman demonstrated tenacity, strength of character, and unwavering dedication to her family and her work. John along with the TCAA continue to believe that these qualities are as essential today as they were 50 or 100 years ago. The TCAA is very grateful to the Willemsma’s for sharing the empowering story of their mother, while providing the resources to promote and encourage a craftswoman to develop and improve in her chosen trade.

Mom’s Scholarship applications will open
July 1st and close September 15th 2017

Send photos and bio to:
John Willemsma 
535 Airway Dr
Westcliffe, Colorado 81252
405 282-5336

Mom’s Scholarship Recipients

2016 – Rawhide Braider, Justine Nelson
2015 – Saddle Maker, Anna Severe

From the workbench of bit maker Wilson Capron

In this these photos below bit and spur maker Wilson Capron shares with us the project he is crafting for the 2013 Cowboy Crossings showing a complete progression of his craft.

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This is the initial drawing of my TCAA 2013 Globe bit.  I first draw things out to secure my design before I start the metal work.


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The top shank has all the inlay cavities chiseled out with just the bottom section left on the bottom shank. After that I will complete the inlays in the rings and then start the mouthpiece.  When the mouthpiece is in place, I will then finish the rest of the inlaying.


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The inlays on the rings are in. With the exception of the one ring that is black in the photo, I have filed the inlays and now I’m in the process of file finishing the rings to a #6 Swiss cut. Next I will start the mouthpiece.


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Today I finished cleaning up the shanks, well to this stage of the game, and the mouthpiece just needs to be sized and then welded into the shanks. It should look like a bit tomorrow.


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It now is coming together. You see the bit and a couple of conchos to mount over the mouthpiece. I had to make a die for them. I have the die as well in the photo. I plan on finishing the fabrication of the conchos. Then the inlays will be completed.


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Today was a long day of making things right. Sometimes things go together without extra effort and them some don’t. I tend to learn more when they don’t. It was real tricky centering the conchos on the shank and then getting the TCAA logo to be pointed up after I screwed the conchos in place. This a new method of putting the conchos on so the kinks had to worked out. The inlays are now in as well and the clean up has started. Filing is finished so hand stoning will commence tomorrow.


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The bit now has reached its final polish. Everything is to an 800 grit polish. I tried a new method by using oil with wet/dry paper on the final step and I really like how it came out. The conchos are now finished as well. One is in place in the photo but only for the photo. The next step is to somehow attach 24 kt gold to the half moon areas that you see above and below the concho. The first method I tried on a practice plate was unsuccessful, so tomorrow will be educational.


I figured out how to get the gold in place this morning. It is called a raised wire inlay. Grooves are cut into the metal wide enough for the gold wire but not as deep as the thickness of the wire so that the gold will stick up above the surface. The difficulty was in the small area I gave myself to work with. Engraving has started as you can see. I lack the top ring and just the inside of the big bottom ring and then on to the other side.

I finished engraving the rings and was able to get the gold inlayed on the opposite side.



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Here is the progress on the engraving. Not to complain but I think if you straighten out the bottom ring it would be a foot long! It takes forever engraving the rope design on the inlay portion. I’m excited about the look so it’s worth it. Next I will finish up the engraving and then start the blueing. I plan to Nitre blue it and antique the silver.


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The blueing is complete. I antiqued the silver before I blued the bit, but I’m not sure how well it turned out. I will determine whether I need to highlight the silver with paint or not. If I do the paint will have to dry overnight and then I can take final photos. It’s getting real close to being finished now!

 

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I have come to the end!  I didn’t like the antiquing so I painted the engraving with an etching ink. The bit took take me a little longer than I expected, but that happens sometimes. I think it is most important to hold true to the integrity of the project and let the time take care of itself. I hope everyone enjoyed the progression. This bit will be displayed at the TCAA show at the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum in October. Please make plans to attend now and if you have any questions feel free to contact me.

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In the Shop: Wilson Capron Workshop

wilson-1I had a workshop April 23-26, 2013 that covered the fundamentals for fabricating a pair of spurs.  The five participants each were able to complete a pair of spurs.  Introductions were made for the use and care of files, the use of a belt sander and different methods to using it, operation of a tig welder, and a buffing machine. A little machine work was also covered with a band saw and a milling machine.  Steel fabrication was focused on so each participant could gain the skills to creating a quality spur.