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Pablo Lozano – The Art of Rawhide by Domingo Hernandez

The award winning professional rawhide braider Pablo Lozano was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Lozano relates his success to the time spent during childhood in the family ranch in Tandil, and his inquisitive nature about Argentina’s cultural legacy.

Initially Lozano started creating small items such as bracelets and knife handles and selling them to friends. While he was building a reputation founded on solid work ethics, while perfecting techniques and constantly learning how to produce the highest quality rawhide gear. In 1985, Lozano began his career as a full-time rawhide braider.

The tradition of rawhide braiding has a long history in Argentina and continues to evolve uninterrupted through generations. Rawhide braiding can be traced to Spain’s first attempt to colonize South America when the Spanish settlers brought shiploads of livestock from Europe to the Pampas, a vast region with an abundance of pastures and an ideal climate for livestock production. With the proliferation of livestock emerged the need for the Gaucho, the horseman of the Pampas, a skillful individual in all rural activities.

Through the years the cattle ranches were built and proved to be productive establishments and as result the Gaucho handcrafted specialized gear to cope with the needs of the cattle industry by utilizing rawhide. This skills were safeguarded and hand down to future generations by word of mouth.

Don Luis Albero Flores by Daniel Sempe

Don Luis Albero Flores by Daniel Sempe

Lozano was always observant and eager to learn rawhide braiding from the hire hands in his family’s ranch. At the age of 15, he noticed that one of his schoolmates had started learning how to braid and the youngster informed Lozano he was receiving instruction from the late Don Luis Alberto Flores, who later became Lozano’s mentor. Moreover, Flores always encouraged Lozano to adhere to the tradition of excellence and to associate with likeminded people with high aspirations. Lozano regularly bounced ideas off and felt inspired by Flores, over time solidifying a lifelong relationship.

Lozano’s inquisitive nature and ranching background launched him into creating fine gear for discerning horsemen and their horses, to compete in national shows, where Lozano’s traditional rawhide braided gear gained popularity. Lozano enjoyed a gradual evolution into custom braid work orders consisting of one-of-a-kind headstalls, reins, bosals, hobbles, cinchas, and reatas to name a few items. Lozano’s traditional handmade masterpieces are recognized for its dependable use and unique beauty due to his command of numerous rawhide braiding techniques and creative talent, gained by a lifetime dedicated to his chosen profession.

Lozano believes that rawhide gear is made to be used and his philosophy is that preparation of the hides is critical to guarantee top quality goods. Also, highlights that is the hide that dictates its application and not the braider.

For Lozano it is a pre-requisite to start with quality hides for the best yield and cut no corners as the hides are being processed from their raw state to achieve the best possible rawhide. The goal is to handcraft the highest quality rawhide gear, because it’s an honor to continue the tradition by making the best goods. Traditions continue to evolve as one blends ancient techniques with creativity to handcraft one-of-a-kind pieces without compromising the function or durability, because as artist that will be one’s legacy.

Lozano has participated in trade shows and exhibits throughout Argentina and has received numerous awards for his traditional rawhide braiding since 1995, to include the best Braider of the Year 2007 in Argentina. Furthermore, Lozano has been recognized by the Academy of Western Artists (AWA) during their 20th Annual Will Rogers Awards, was selected Braider of the Year 2015.

Lozano’s skill, talent and knowledge has helped training and mentoring several aspiring braiders from his shop in Tandil. Also, has assisted braiders from Australia, Brazil, Germany, Uruguay and the United States during workshops. Braiders seek his advice and constructive criticism in Facebook, despite the idiomatic barriers. He starts his workshops by encouraging all participants to let him know what they would like to learn. And he encourages learning from someone who have already achieved success in the trade.

He believes in the concept of apprenticeships and has had several apprentices as a means to educate and identify those that possess the skill and dedication required to execute the precise braiding that becomes a work of art, in an effort to safeguard the cultural legacy for future generations.

Several of Lozano’s creations had been awarded “best of show” because his traditional rawhide showcases the skillful execution of numerous techniques, and excellence in craftsmanship.

In 2004, thanks to the support of friends and fellow braiders Leland Hensley, Nate Wald and Mike Beaver, and under the auspice of the Traditional Cowboy Arts Association (TCAA), was invited to participate in a braiding seminar at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum (NC&WHM) in Oklahoma City, OK. During the visit Lozano had the privilege to meet members of the TCAA present during the exhibit. He was impressed by their work, the member’s creativity, optimism and passion for the Western heritage.

Lozano was also impressed by the partnerships forged between the TCAA and the NC&WHM, and their goal to preserve and promote the Western heritage with a focus in bit & spur making, saddle making, silversmithing and rawhide braiding. The alliance has generated interest in these trades and the TCAA.

Upon return to Argentina Lozano started learning about the practical applications of the rawhide gear utilized by the Vaqueros and their influence in the Western heritage. Lozano credits friends Leland Hensley and Nate Wald for their assistance which helped him gained an understanding of the applications of the gear utilized by horsemen in the United States. Subsequently, in 2008 Lozano applied and became a member of the TCAA, the organization that has been committed to the critical mission of safeguarding the Western Heritage and traditional trades through education. Lozano believes that “every artist is a craftsman, however not all craftsmen are artist, they are separated by their creativity”. He added that all members of the TCAA are artist that deserve credit not only for the one-of-a-kind artwork they create for the annual exhibit but for their contributions to the industry. Also, their role as educators in furtherance of their chosen trade is commendable, this will be the TCAA and its member’s legacy!

Since 2009, when Lozano’s rawhide braid work was first exhibited in the TCAA show he has made an effort to create pieces in collaboration with fellow TCAA members, because he is passionate about rawhide braiding and proud to be a member of the TCAA. Lozano would like his legacy to be the advancement of rawhide braiding for the enjoyment of future generations.